Posts made in September, 2016

Richard E. Bush Corporal

Posted on Sep 15, 2016

 

Featuring Marine Medal of Honor Recipients From WWII-Korea-Viet Nam and Iraqi Freedom
Honor-Courage-Commitment

Richard E. Bush
Corporal
United States Marine Corps Reserve
Corporal Richard E. Bush
United States Marine Corps Reserve

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Squad Leader serving with the First Battalion, Fourth Marines, Sixth Marine Division, in action against Japanese forces during the final assault against Mt. Yaetake on Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 16 April 1945. Rallying his men forward with indomitable determination, Corporal Bush boldly defied the slashing fury of concentrated Japanese artillery fire pouring down from the gun-studded mountain fortress to lead his squad up the face of the rocky precipice, sweep over the ridge and drive the defending troops from their deeply entreched position. With his unit, the first to break through to the inner defense of Mt. Yaetake, he fought relentlessly in the forefront of the action until seriously wounded and evacuated with others under protecting rocks. Although prostrate under medical treatment when a Japanese hand grenade landed in the midst of the group, Corporal Bush, alert and courageous inextremity as in battle, unhesitatingly pulled the deadly missle to himself and absorbed the shattering violenceof the exploding charge in his own body, thereby saving his fellow Marines form severe injury or death despite the certain peril to his own life. By his valiant leadership and aggressive tactics in the face of savage opposition, Corporal Bush contributed materially to the success of the sustained drive toward the conquest of this fiercely defended outpost of the Japanese Empire and his constant concern for the welfare of his men, his resolute spirit of self-sacrifice and his unwavering devotion to duty throughout the bitter conflict enhance and sustain the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service

Harry S. Truman
President of the United States

Master Gunnery Sergeant Richard E. Bush, who received the Medal of Honor as a corporal for heroism on Okinawa in World War II, was born in Glasgow, Kentucky, on 23 December 1924.

Before his enlistment on 22 September 1942 in Bowling Green, Kentucky, he worked for his father as a tractor driver and completed one year of high school. He received his basic training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, California, and later was transferred to a replacement battalion at Camp Elliott, California, for further training as an armorer. He later served with the highly decorated Marine Corps Raiders in the Pacific.

On 16 April 1945, Cpl Bush, as squad leader for 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 6th Marine Division, led his men in a charge against an enemy stronghold during the final assault against Mount Yaetake in northern Okinawa. During that action, he ignored his own wounds until ordered to seek treatment. While in the makeshift medical camp, Cpl Bush threw himself upon an enemy grenade that had been hurled among the medical staff and other wounded Marines. On 4 October 1945, President Harry S. Truman, in a White House ceremony, presented Cpl Bush with the Medal of Honor for “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.” He also was awarded the Purple Heart for wounds received on Okinawa.

In the years following the war, MGySgt Bush worked for the Veterans Administration as a counselor and earned numerous civilian awards for his efforts to aid other veterans despite constant problems with his one functioning eye, a holdover from his World War II wounds.

Master Gunnery Sergeant Bush died of a heart ailment at the age of 79 on 7 June 2004 in Waukegan, Illinois. He was buried in Ascension Catholic Cemetery in Libertyville, Illinois.

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Franklin Earl Sigler

Posted on Sep 1, 2016

Private First Class Franklin Earl Sigler won the Medal of Honor during the Iwo Jima campaign in a one-man assault on a Japanese gun position which had been holding up the advance of his company for several days, and for annihilating the enemy gun crew with hand grenades. Although painfully wounded during his attack, he directed the fire of his squad and personally carried three of his buddies who were wounded to safety behind the lines.

The nation’s highest military decoration was presented to Private First Class Sigler during ceremonies at the White House. President Truman awarded the medal to him on Friday, October 5, 1945.

Franklin Earl Sigler was born at Montclair, New Jersey, November 6, 1924, the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Sigler. They later moved to Little Falls, New Jersey, where he attended Little Falls High School prior to his enlistment in the Marine Corps on March 23, 1943.

Completing his recruit training at Parris Island, South Carolina, Private First Class Sigler was next transferred to the Guard Company, Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Charleston, South Carolina, in June, 1943.

In April, 1944 he joined Company F, 2d Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division, and in July he embarked aboard the USS Clay for Hilo, Hawaii. Later, he sailed for Iwo Jima where he won the Medal of Honor on March 14, 1945.

Private First Class Sigler, then a private, took command of his squad when his squad leader became a casualty and unhesitatingly lead them in a bold rush against an enemy gun position that had been holding up the advance of his company for several days.

Reaching the gun position first, he personally annihilated the gun crew with grenades. When more enemy troops began firing from tunnels and caves leading to the gun position, he, without consideration for his own safety, successfully scaled the rocks leading up to the position and alone assaulted the Japanese completely surprising them.

Although painfully wounded in this one-man assault, he refused to be evacuated, and crawling back to his squad, directed machine gun fire and rocket fire on the cave entrances. In the ensuing fight three of his men were wounded and Private First Class Sigler, disregarding the pain from his wound and the heavy enemy fire, carried them to safety behind the lines. Returning to his squad he remained with his men directing their fire until ordered to retire and seek medical aid.

Hospitalized in the U.S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland, he was discharged with the rank of private first class in June, 1946 because of disability resulting from his wounds. PFC Sigler died January 20, 1995.

In addition to the Medal of Honor, Private First Class Sigler was awarded the American Campaign Medal; Good Conduct Medal; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal; Purple Heart, and the World War II Victory Medal.

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